Waking up

I used to refer to missing a weekly entry in my blog as a “blink”. Then I started to snooze for a few weeks at a time. Since Christmas of 2018, I’ve gone into all-out hibernation in the blog department.

Life on another front, on the other hand, has been more active than usual. From January to March, I enrolled in the basic training for people who aspire to the “Master Gardener” designation. The course involved a full day of classes and about ten hours of reading and research assignments each week.

“It will be intense,” they said. They did not lie.

My learnings have led to new insights.

In the Master Gardener program, we are taught the principle, “Right plant in the right place makes a healthy, happy plant.” Something I didn’t understand decades ago makes perfect sense now.

My Aunt Velma, one of my mother’s sisters, was an avid gardener. When she heard we had bought a house after I got married, she lovingly divided one of her favourite plants so I could have it in my garden, too.

“I call these rosabluebells because I don’t like the real name. The flowers come out pink and gradually turn blue,” she said. She may also have mentioned they do well in the shade. By my logic, if a plant did well in the shade, imagine how much better it would do in the sun.

So I planted the rosabluebells along the foundation of the south-facing wall of our house. I recall a visitor saying, “Oh, I see you have some lungworts.” No wonder Aunt Velma hadn’t shared the name.

Over time, other plants took over the area where I had planted the lungworts. I wasn’t as into gardening then as I am now and likely wasn’t that keen on having a plant with such an ugly name, anyway. They died out and faded in my memory. 

I recently learned that plants that do well in the shade typically developed as woodland plants and actually need shade and moisture. No wonder my neglected lungworts languished. https://plantdatabase.kpu.ca/plant/plantDetail/1007

In the Master Gardener program, we are also taught to use the Botanical or Scientific names for plants, rather than their common names. If that had been the general practice, my aunt would not have had to rename her prized plant.

Its botanical name is Pulmonaria.

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