The evolution of my Christmas tree star

On October 25, I got an unwelcome e-mail with the subject line: Hi Threadies, Felting Art Sessions on Oct 26th and Nov 30th are cancelled.

I’ve been a “Threadie” for a couple of years – we’re a sewing circle at my local neighbourhood house that’s intended to build community. All the materials to make felt toys and ornaments are supplied. Women and girls from eight to eighty and from various countries gather to sew. We help each other with our projects and enjoy each others’ company.  

In the summer, I found a pattern for a new star for my Christmas tree.

The ornaments I treasure most are made by hand by myself or family members – crocheted candy canes and Sesame Street characters my mother made when my children were the age my grandchildren are now, a set of salt-and-flour dough crèche characters I sculpted when my children were preschoolers, and some snowflakes my niece crocheted. The plastic, glittery star from my snowflake themed tree days had to go.

In the first couple of sessions, I cut out three felt stars – a small dark red, a medium white, and a large light red. By the end of September, I had accentuated the smallest star with beads of various shades of red and the white star with white and clear beads. In October and November, I had planned to decorate the outer star with red beads, sew on a backing, and stuff the whole thing with wool.

This cancellation created a dilemma because I no longer had access to the supplies. I hadn’t brought home embroidery cotton or red beads to finish the project.

I remembered I had inherited from Auntie Frances a box of embroidery floss that I haven’t opened in decades. Luckily, it had both white and red floss.

I didn’t have any small red beads on hand, but maybe there were some red buttons in my stash from my and my female ancestors’ past projects. I had a few, but not nearly enough to decorate the outer star.

However, I had lots of white buttons and some small white beads. I decided to integrate the white and red colours into a lively combo.

The star didn’t turn out the way I imagined it would if things had gone according to plan.

In my mind, it turned out much better.

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2 thoughts on “The evolution of my Christmas tree star

  1. Debbie Adare

    Thanks for sharing this story, and the picture of your star, Wilda! You did a great job improvising to get it to the finish line. All best wishes for more fun and projects in 2020 🙂

    Reply
    1. Wilda Bostwick

      Thanks, Debbie. You’ll notice I’ve been inspired to get my blog back in gear. Your feedback helped to propel me.

      Reply

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